Suiting Fabrics / Grading Wool Fiber

Grading Wool Fiber

When a Wool Grader examines wool fiber, the diameter width of the fiber is measured (in microns) to determine the Super count designation:

Super S Value Maximum Fibre Diameter * Super S Value Maximum Fibre Diameter *
SUPER 80’S 19,75 µ SUPER 170’S 15,25 µ
SUPER 90’S 19,25 µ SUPER 180’S 14,75 µ
SUPER 100’S 18,75 µ SUPER 190’S 14,25 µ
SUPER 110’S 18,25 µ SUPER 200’S 13,75 µ
SUPER 120’S 17,75  µ SUPER 210’S 13,25 µ
SUPER 130’S 17,25 µ SUPER 220’S 12,75 µ
SUPER 140’S 16,75 µ SUPER 230’S 12,25 µ
SUPER 150’S 16,25 µ SUPER 240’S 11,75 µ
SUPER 160’S 15,75 µ SUPER 250’S 11,25 µ

 

This is just the start of the grading process.

While all fiber on a particular Merino sheep has the same diameter micron count, only the prized long filament fiber (from the neck and the flank) is used for worsted wool yarns spun by Dormeuil.

The fiber is therefore graded on fiber length as well as width. 

Tests are then conducted to determine the tensile strength of the fiber. Healthy sheep produce strong fiber.

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The consistency of the fiber crimp is then measured. A healthy sheep produces fiber with consistent crimp.

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The color of the fiber is then examined to determine what will be sent to the scourer for cleaning. A wet season will discolor the wool fiber with dirt and vegetable matter.

This picture shows wool fiber before and after scouring.

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While the diameter width (in microns) is a very important factor when grading wool fiber, so is lengthstrengthcrimp, and color.

At the House of Dormeuil, only select “filet mignon” worsted wool fiber is used to produce exclusive luxury cloth at the end of the quality spectrum. 

Juan Marcano

Rex Fabrics

Luke Mayes

Dormeuill

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